swamp

I.
/swɒmp / (say swomp)

noun
1. a piece or tract of wet, spongy land; marshy ground; an area of still, often stagnant water.
2. a tract of soft, wet ground having a growth of certain kinds of trees, but unfit for cultivation.
verb (t)
3. to flood or drench with water or the like.
4. Nautical to sink or fill (a boat) with water.
5. to plunge or sink in or as in a swamp.
6. to overwhelm; dominate: *(at Christmas time) the vestiges of cultural heritage are all but swamped by tawdry commercial activity –hugh mackay, 1999.
7. to render helpless.
verb (i)
8. to fill with water and sink, as a boat.
9. to sink or stick in or as in a swamp.
{alteration of Middle English sompe swamp, probably influenced by Low German swampen to quake and Middle High German swamp sponge, fungus. See sump}
II.
/swɒmp / (say swomp)

verb (i)
1. to act as an assistant to a bullock-driver.
2. to travel on foot beside a bullock team, carrier's wagon, etc., on which one's swag, gear, etc., is being carried, giving assistance if needed to the driver.
{backformation from swamper}

Australian English dictionary. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Swamp — Swamp, n. [Cf. AS. swam a fungus, OD. swam a sponge, D. zwam a fungus, G. schwamm a sponge, Icel. sv[ o]ppr, Dan. & Sw. swamp, Goth. swamms, Gr. somfo s porous, spongy.] Wet, spongy land; soft, low ground saturated with water, but not usually… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • swamp — [swɒmp ǁ swɑːmp] verb [transitive] 1. to suddenly give someone a lot of work or things to deal with: • The flood of orders swamped some understaffed trading desks. swamp be swamped (with something) • Brokers said they were swamped with calls… …   Financial and business terms

  • swamp — [swämp, swômp] n. [< dial. var. (or LowG cognate) of ME sompe, akin to MLowG swamp, Goth & OE swamm, fungus, mushroom < IE base * swomb(h)os, spongy, porous > Gr somphos, spongy] a piece of wet, spongy land that is permanently or… …   English World dictionary

  • swamp — 1624 (first used by Capt. John Smith, in reference to Virginia), perhaps a dialectal survival from an O.E. cognate of O.N. svoppr sponge, fungus, from P.Gmc. *swampuz; but traditionally connected with M.E. sompe morass, swamp, probably from M.Du …   Etymology dictionary

  • swamp — swamp; swamp·ber·ry; swamp·er; swamp·i·ness; …   English syllables

  • swamp|y — «SWOM pee, SWM », adjective, swamp|i|er, swamp|i|est. 1. like a swamp; soft and wet: »swampy ground. The front yard is swampy from the heavy rain. SYNONYM(S): boggy, marshy …   Useful english dictionary

  • Swamp — Swamp, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Swamped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Swamping}.] 1. To plunge or sink into a swamp. [1913 Webster] 2. (Naut.) To cause (a boat) to become filled with water; to capsize or sink by whelming with water. [1913 Webster] 3. Fig.: To… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Swamp — Swamp, v. i. 1. To sink or stick in a swamp; figuratively, to become involved in insuperable difficulties. [1913 Webster] 2. To become filled with water, as a boat; to founder; to capsize or sink; figuratively, to be ruined; to be wrecked. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • swamp — [n] wet land covered with vegetation bog, bottoms, everglade, fen, glade, holm, marsh, marshland, mire, moor, morass, mud, muskeg, peat bog, polder, quag, quagmire, slough, swale, swampland; concept 509 swamp [v] overwhelm, flood beset, besiege,… …   New thesaurus

  • swamp|er — «SWOM puhr, SWM », noun. U.S. 1. a person who lives in a swamp or swampy region: »Everybody thought we were just a state of hillbillies and swampers (Time). 2. a) a person who works clearing roads for lumberjacks or clearing fallen trees of limbs …   Useful english dictionary

  • swamp — index immerse (plunge into), inundate, overcome (overwhelm) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

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